Onar Åm


Onar Åm is a renowned speaker and author in Norway and writes extensively on libertarian issues.

Red Bull’s boss and Austria’s richest man Dietrich Mateschitz in a recent interview came out strongly against mass migration and multiculturalism, warning that it may destroy Europe’s true cultural diversity. From Breitbart:

Speaking to Kleine Zeitung, the Formula 1 investor called the decision of key politicians to open the borders — which resulted in Europe’s migration crisis — “unpardonable,” noting that “if a company were to make mistakes on the same scale, it would have gone broke.”

Mateschitz also pointed out:

 “I hope I’m not the only one who’s worried that one of the highest officials in Brussels said that countries which aren’t multicultural should be wiped off the map,” Mateschitz told the newspaper, possibly alluding to comments made by European Commission Vice-President Frans Timmermans in 2015.

Such sentiments are not hard to find in Europe, but it is highly unusual for someone regarded to be part of the elite to voice politically incorrect views like these publically. For several decades, cultural Marxism has been completely dominating the public discourse. Until very recently, it would have been impossible for Mateschitz to express his views on the subject without being branded a racist or right wing extremist.

There are, however, indications that this situation is about to change. For those willing to look, the signs have been there for a long time. All across Europe, political parties and movements hostile to non-European immigration have been steadily growing in popularity.

The Freedom Party of Austria (FPÖ) has been popular for a long time. Sweden’s Sverigedemokraterna (Democrats) recently became the largest party in a national poll. Geert Wilders’ Freedom Party (PVV) in Netherlands recently had its best election ever, increasing support by one-third. Marine Le Pen’s Front National has in recent years positioned itself as one of France’s largest parties, and a realistic candidate regarding the upcoming presidential election. The United Kingdom infamously voted for Brexit, which has been interpreted by many as a resounding no to multicultural immigration, following the migration crisis in Europe.

Also, there is significant movement in the cultural underground of Europe. Activist groups that call themselves Identitarian have sprung up all over Europe. They describe themselves as pan-European and want to preserve the cultural identity of Europe, by stopping all immigration from non-European countries, echoing the sentiments of Red Bull boss Mateschitz.

Although the Identitarian Movement has been labeled “far right,” a recent poll in February shows that they are far more centrist than anyone could have imagined just a few years ago.  The poll revealed that 55% of Europeans wanted to ban future immigration from all majority Muslim countries permanently. This occurred at just the same time that the left in the U.S. was accusing President Donald Trump of practically being a neo-Nazi for wanting to temporarily ban immigration from seven majority Muslim countries classified as a high-security risk by the Obama-administration.

Not only that, but only 20% of Europeans disagreed with the ban, while 25% said they did not know. In other words, only 20% of Europeans support the globalist elite and their politicians, who desire an open borders policy.

The situation we have today is, therefore, akin to that of H.C. Andersen’s famous fairytale “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” where the silent majority knows that their leader stands naked before them. In the story, only a spark was needed to ignite the majority into staying silent no longer. There are some indications that Europe is quickly approaching such a situation.

The migration crisis of 2015 was one such spark, which possibly inspired the majority in the United Kingdom to vote for Brexit. It now also seems that the recent terror attack in Sweden has finally sparked the silent majority to wake up from its utopian multiculturalism. Even politicians of the left-wing Social Democratic Party have started publically voicing that “perhaps we have been a little naïve about immigration.” Such an admission would have been unthinkable only a short while ago.

If this reading of the European zeitgeist is correct, then in the coming years we will see a significant move away from multiculturalism in Europe. There is still a little energy left for fear of being branded racist for harboring such views, so the shift if it occurs, will largely happen silently.